DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2394-6040.ijcmph20213557

Age-sex specific mortality pattern in a tertiary care teaching hospital in North Karnataka, India

Gowri Shankar, Eshwar Basaveneppa Kalburgi, SanthoshKumar R. Naik

Abstract


Background: Age-sex specific mortality pattern is one of the most fundamental metrics of population health. It is the most frequently used health care indicator and a valuable tool for planning and management in hospitals.

Methods: A retrospective study of all deaths that occurred in the year 2020 in Hangal Sri Kumareshwar hospital and research centre, Navanagar, Bagalkot, Karnataka was done by analyzing the records from medical records department after institutional review board clearance. Data regarding age, sex, area of residence, ward of admission and cause of death was noted and analyzed using percentages and Chi square test. Cause of death was classified according to ICD 10.

Results: Out of 455 deaths in the year 2020, males contributed to 63.30% of the deaths and females to 36.70% deaths. Maximum number of deaths occurred between 61 to 80 years (28.79%) followed by those between 41 to 60 years (27.47%) and 20 to 40 years (20.66%). Maximum number of deaths was due to a non-communicable disease (62.86%). Cardiovascular disease contributed to 28.57% of the total deaths. COVID-19 contributed to 6.37% of the deaths.

Conclusions: Large scale investment in medical infrastructure to treat non communicable disease (NCDs) and increased health insurance coverage will be helpful in the long term plans. Awareness regarding a healthy life style can reduce the risk factors for NCDs and avoidable mortality. Preventive measures to curtail COVID-19 pandemic are the need of the hour. Estimates of premature mortality are essential to reduce preventable deaths and improve population health.


Keywords


Age-sex specific mortality, Hospital deaths

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References


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