DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2394-6040.ijcmph20212593

Dyslipidaemia among diabetes and hypertensive patients in a remote rural area of South India, in comparison with ICMR-InDiab study

Vedanayagame Dorthy, Ilango Malar, F. N. U. Anisha, Ann Sara Alexander, Ariarathinam Newtonraj, Ganesan Girija

Abstract


Background: The aim of the study was to find out the prevalence and determinants of dyslipidaemia among DM and HT group in a remote rural area of India and comparing with ICMR-InDiab study.  

Methods: We screened high risk individuals (hypertension and diabetes patients) for dyslipidemia covering ten villages surrounding a Rural Health Training Centre (RHTC) located in South India, in August-September 2017. Participants were line listed from the electronic data base maintained in RHTC and were screened at their door step by visiting their house.

Results: Mean values of all lipids among the high-risk population were increased significantly (p<0.01). Prevalence of hypercholesterolemia was three times more, hypertriglyceridemia was 1.3 times higher, high LDL cholesterol was 3.3 times higher, high cholesterol HDL ratio was 1.5 times higher and isolated hypercholesterolemia was 3.6 times higher among the high-risk population. On the other hand, isolated hypertriglyceridemia has 30% less likely and isolated low HDL was 40% less likely among high risk populations in comparison to ICMR-InDiab study. Female gender [low HDL- aOR 2.1(1.1-4.2)], [high LDL- aOR 2.2(1.3-3.7)] and hypothyroidism [hypercholesterolemia- aOR 10.1(1.1-89)] were directly associated and; underweight [hypercholesterolemia- adjusted Odds ratio (aOR)- 0.4(0.2-0.9)], [hypertriglyceridemia 0.4(0.1-1.0)], and anaemia [hypertriglyceridemia aOR- 0.5(0.3-0.8)] were inversely associated with dyslipidemia.

Conclusions: Dyslipedaemia was higher among the DM and HT participants in a remote rural area of South India.


Keywords


Cholesterol, Triglycerides, LDL, HDL, Dyslipidaemia, Lipid profile

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