DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2394-6040.ijcmph20203922

Role of sleep and stress in metabolic syndrome: a community based cross sectional study in Rishikesh, Uttarakhand

Senkadhirdasan Dakshinamurthy, Vartika Saxena, Ranjeeta Kumari, Anissa Atif Mirza, Minakshi Dhar, Ashutosh Mishra

Abstract


Background: Sleep disturbances and stress may intervene with the physiological processes in human body and act as a modulator of metabolic homeostasis. The aim and objectives of the study were to estimate the person’s average sleep propensity; to estimate the stress level in the study subjects; and to determine the association of sleep and stress with metabolic syndrome.

Methods: A community based cross sectional study was conducted in an urban area of Rishikesh. Sample size was calculated to be 478. Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS Version 20.0. Chi-square test was used to examine the association between categorical variables. A p value of <0.05 was considered significant.

Results: It was observed that different levels of stress did not have any significant association with metabolic syndrome (MetS) though the odds among individuals with moderate stress were 1.1 times (95% CI 0.6-2.2) higher than those with low stress. The overall sleepiness grading was not significantly associated with Metabolic Syndrome. However, people with mild excessive daytime sleepiness have 4.7 times (95% CI 1.2-18) higher odds of MetS as compared to those with low normal daytime sleepiness. Those with moderate excessive day sleepiness had 1.59 times (95% CI 0.3-8) higher odds of MetS, however it was not statistically significant.

Conclusions: Mild excessive daytime sleepiness was associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome. People with perceived stress are having higher chance of getting MetS.


Keywords


Cardiometabolic risk, Epworth sleepiness scale, MetS, NCEP ATP 3 criteria, Non-communicable diseases, Perceived stress scale, Uttarakhand

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