Quantitative assessment of prosocial behaviour and trends of transfusion transmitted infections among voluntary blood donors: a cross sectional study

Authors

  • Siva Balaji Reddy Satti Department of Community Medicine, Bhaskar Medical College, Yenkapally, Rangareddy District, Telangana, India
  • Ravikumar B. Civil assistant surgeon, Blood bank, Directorate of Institute of Preventive Medicine Public Health Labs & Food Administration, Narayanaguda, Hyderabad, Telangana, India
  • Vijayasanti V. Civil assistant surgeon, Blood bank, Directorate of Institute of Preventive Medicine Public Health Labs & Food Administration, Narayanaguda, Hyderabad, Telangana, India
  • Amarender Reddy K. Director, Directorate of Institute of Preventive Medicine Public Health Labs & Food Administration, Narayanaguda, Hyderabad, Telangana, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/2394-6040.ijcmph20171376

Keywords:

Prosocial behaviour, Transfusion transmitted infections, Voluntary blood donors

Abstract

Background: Every country faces an ongoing challenge to collect blood from safe donors. Chronic blood shortages are common in developing countries. According to WHO Voluntary blood donation practices are encouraged to collect safe blood units. In India for donating the blood often they say prosocial reasons. The objectives of the present study was quantitative assessment of prosocial behaviour as well as trends of transfusion transmitted infections among (voluntary blood donors) VBD.

Methods: Cross-sectional study carried out between 1st January 2016 to 31st august 2016, at the field practice area of Institute of preventive medicine (IPM), Narayanaguda, Telangana state, India. The total sample size estimated was 41,356 (by Census survey method). Among which 25,641(62%) were current donors and 15,715 (38%) lapsed donors likewise 35,980 males and 5,376 females were enrolled.

Results: Among the participants majority (87%) were males compare to females (13%). out of 41,352 donors majority were current donors (62%) compare to lapsed donors (38%). Among current donors all the mean scores of prosocial behaviour components were high and The trends of All TTIs infection prevalence rates were declined progressively.

Conclusions: Sustainable motivational levels may increase the frequency of blood donation and by encouraging VBDs one can reduce the TTIs. 

Author Biographies

Siva Balaji Reddy Satti, Department of Community Medicine, Bhaskar Medical College, Yenkapally, Rangareddy District, Telangana, India

Assistant professor

Department of community Medicine

Bhaskar Medical College,Yenkapally,

Rangareddy district, Telangana, India.

e-mail:[email protected]

                                                                   Mobile:8500861405

Ravikumar B., Civil assistant surgeon, Blood bank, Directorate of Institute of Preventive Medicine Public Health Labs & Food Administration, Narayanaguda, Hyderabad, Telangana, India

Civil assistant surgeon, Blood bank,

Directorate of Institute of Preventive Medicine Public Health Labs & Food Administration. Narayanaguda,Hyderabad,Telangana,Pin Code :500029.

Mobile:9515371599, e-mail: [email protected]

Vijayasanti V., Civil assistant surgeon, Blood bank, Directorate of Institute of Preventive Medicine Public Health Labs & Food Administration, Narayanaguda, Hyderabad, Telangana, India

Civil assistant surgeon, Blood bank,

Directorate of Institute of Preventive Medicine Public Health Labs & Food Administration. Narayanaguda,Hyderabad,Telangana,Pin Code :500029.

Mobile:9948523600,e-mail: [email protected]

Amarender Reddy K., Director, Directorate of Institute of Preventive Medicine Public Health Labs & Food Administration, Narayanaguda, Hyderabad, Telangana, India

Director

Directorate of Institute of Preventive Medicine Public Health Labs & Food Administration. Narayanaguda,Hyderabad,Telangana,Pin Code :500029.

References

Sanguinis V. WHO ExpertGroup, Expert consensus statement on achieving self-sufficiency in safe blood and blood products, based on voluntary non-remunerated blood donation . 2012; 103(4): 337–42.

WHO, WHO 10 Facts on Blood Transfusion, World Health Organization, 2014. Available at http: //www.who.int / features / factfiles /blood -transfusion/en/. Accessed on 05 September 2015.

Salaudeen AG, Odeh E. Knowledge and behaviour towards voluntary blood donation among students of a tertiary institution in Nigeria. Nigerian J Clin Pract. 2011;14(3):303–7.

Benedict N, Usimenahon A, Alexander NI, Isi A. Knowledge, attitude and practice of voluntary blood donation among physicians in a tertiary health facility of a developing country. IJBTI. 2012;2: 4-10.

Marwaha N. Voluntary blood donation in India: Achievements, expectations and challenges. Asian J Transfusion Sci. 2015;9(1):1-2.

WHO. Facts about blood donation. 2008. Available at http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/

fs279/en/. Accessed on 12 July 2016.

Widman FK. Technical manual. American Association of Blood Banks. Arlington; 1985: 325–344

Bhalodia Jignasa N, Patel Kinara A, Oza Hiren V. Psychosocial variables of highly motivated voluntary blood donors at blood bank of a medical college. Natl J Med Res. 2012; 2(1) :39-41.

Dovidio JF, Penner LA. Helping and altruism. In: Brewer MB, Hewston M, editors. Emotion and motivation: perspectives in social psychology. Malden (MA): Blackwell; 2004: 247-280.

Batson CD. The altruism question: Toward a social-psychological answer. Hillsdale: Erlbaum Associates; 1991.

Batson CD. Prosocial motivation: Is it ever truly altruistic? In L. Berkowitz (Ed.), Advances in Experimental Social Psychology. Volume 20. New York: Academic Press; 1987: 65-122.

Lucas M, Wagner L. Born selfish? Rationality, altruism, and the initial state. Behav Brain Sci. 2005;28:829-30.

Rushton JP. Is altruism innate? Psychol Inq. 1991;2:141-3.

King MR, Mathew S, Glynn SA, Caswell SL, Schreiber G. To volunteer or not to volunteer: is blood donation perceived as a volunteer activity? Transfusion. 2004;44(9):184.

Batson CD, Ahmad N, Stocks ELA. Benefits and liabilities of empathy-induced altruism. In: Miller AG, editor. The social psychology of good and evil. New York: Guilford Press; 2004: 359-385.

Cialdini RB, Schaller M, Houlihan D, Arps K, Fultz J, Beaman AL. Empathy-based helping: is it selflessly or selfishly motivated? J Pers Soc Psychol. 1987;52:749-58.

Brems C. Dimensionality of empathy and its correlates. J Psychol 1989;123:329-37.

Hupfer ME. Helping me, helping you: self-referencing and gender roles in donor advertising. Transfusion. 2006;46:996-1005.

Brunel F, Nelson M. Explaining gendered responses to“help-self” and “help-others” charity ad appeals: the mediating role of world-views. J Advert. 2000;29:15-28.

Putnam RD. Bowling alone: the collapse and revival of American community. New York: Simon & Schuster; 2000.

Kolins J, Herron R. On bowling alone and donor recruitment: lessons to be learned. Transfusion. 2003;43:1634-8.

Gupta PK, Kumar H, Basannar DR, Jaiprakash M. Transfusion transmitted infections in armed forces: prevalence and trends. MJAFI. 2006;62:348–50.

Kakkar N, Kaur R, Dhanoa J. Voluntary donors—need for a second look. Indian J Pathol Microbiol. 2004;47:381–3.

Garg S, Mathur DR, Garg DK. Comparison of seropositivity of HIV. HBV, HCV and syphilis in replacement and voluntary blood donors in western India. Indian J Pathol Microbiol. 2001;44:409–12.

Sing B, Verma M, Verma K. Markers for transfusion associated hepatitis in north Indian blood donors: prevalence and trends. Jpn J Infect Dis. 2004;57:49–51.

Srikrishna A, Sitalaxmi S, Prema Damodar S. How safe are our safe donors? Indian J Pathol Microbiol. 1991;42:411–6.

Ekadashi R, Langer S. Seroprevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and syphilis in blood donors of Delhi. Indian J Microbiol. 2009;27:167–8.

Makroo RN, Sahil P, Vashist RP, Lal S. Trends of HIV infection in blood donors of Delhi. Indian J Pathol Microbiol. 1996;39:139–42.

Choudhury N, Phadke S. Transfusion transmitted disease. Indian J Paediatr. 2001;68:951–8.

Sawke N, Sawke GK, Chawla S. Seroprevalence of common transfusion—transmitted infections among blood donors. People’s J Sci Res. 2010;30:5–7.

Downloads

Published

2017-03-28

How to Cite

Satti, S. B. R., B., R., V., V., & K., A. R. (2017). Quantitative assessment of prosocial behaviour and trends of transfusion transmitted infections among voluntary blood donors: a cross sectional study. International Journal Of Community Medicine And Public Health, 4(4), 1360–1366. https://doi.org/10.18203/2394-6040.ijcmph20171376

Issue

Section

Original Research Articles